Car Gorilla Adverts

Op-Ed By Wimsett

Guerrilla marketing for cars seems to suggest too many young guns given too much money. If it’s to show how wonderful the car is, that’s all to the good, but a weird idea doesn’t automatically sell the car. You need to think about your advertising in greater detail.

It’s not as if you can replace each billboard with a guerrilla campaign, it’s something you can only do in huge built up areas. And as suggested above, it’s a bit hit and miss.

However it does give a humorous direction to tempt potential buyers, particularly those who don’t respond to TV or radio adverts or even those Facebook adverts. In other words, advertisements for people who don’t respond, or feel they don’t respond to mainstream commercials.

Some campaigns do seem better than others, Honda’s “The Power of Dreams” seems memorable. But a large funnel of knickknacks going into a back of a box containing a Honda doesn’t necessarily work.

It does tend to be the more expensive cars such as a huge monster hand coming from nowhere holding a BMW or a Mercedes Benz apparently crashing through a poster. Maybe you remember an Alfa Romeo in a tiny shopping cart (held in place by ropes) or a SEAT, S.A. in a large plastic box where it is slightly obscured? No?

Then there was the mini cooper campaign which showed a conveyor belt with baggage coming out of it or a Renault in a giant snow globe. Or things like a car held in place by a giant bike lock or an upside-down car apparently being held in place by chewing gums. Then you have Smart Cars apparently being dispensed by a giant vending machine. Ideas about size and having the car at funny angles seem to play a part in most of these guerrilla ideas.

You might like an idea which includes technology and access to information as this is what 70% of car users are interested in. Could it be turned into a video? Video is what convinced 61% of potential buyers to buy a car in 2019. It makes sense-a moving image is much more convincing than a stunt in a mall.

What are we supposed to make of these ideas? There could be a link to economy in design with the vending machine or the giant bike lock ideas, you’re buying these because it’s a small car. The conveyor belt idea meanwhile must surely indicate a spacious trunk. Or the snow globe a celebration of the Christmas season as well as an advertisement for the car. Most ideas do seem a bit of a mishmash.

It should be pointed out that there is difficulty in coming up with a campaign to indicate a family car or a car for the older market. In these cases, your best bet is to rely on traditional advertising techniques.

Despite this young buck feeling of using obscure ideas and concepts there must be something profitable occurring or else it wouldn’t continue. It goes without saying that just because a crazy ad catches your eye, doesn’t mean you buy the car without further research.

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