How To Take Off Window Tint

You probably are reading this critique because your window tint doesn’t look new anymore. You may have spotted some peeling along the edges, bubbles, or scratches on its surface. Luckily, you can take off your car’s window tint without hiring a professional. Here’s how to take off window tint the easy way.

Use a Hairdryer

You can remove your window tint using a hairdryer. The process also works well with a heat gun. However, you need to figure out a good corner to start removing the tint.

Hold the dryer two inches away from the window and run it high to allow the glue to melt. Remove the tip of the tint from the corner you choose. Gently pull the tint as the dryer melts glue on other parts. Once you remove the tint, clean the car windows before replacing them with another tint.

Use a Steamer

You can also use a steamer to take off your window tint. To do this, roll your car window down slightly so that the top part of the tint is visible. Steam the edges of the window from the outside to melt the adhesive.

After that, steam the other parts of the window and use a razor to lift the edges for easy pulling. Steam other edges where the adhesive hasn’t completely melted. You can then remove the entire tint once the glue melts completely.

Use Ammonia

To remove your window tint using this method, you will need ammonia, dish soap, and paper towels. Other materials that will make the process less stressful include steel wool, scissors, a spray bottle, and a razor blade.

When ammonia comes into contact with the adhesive on sunny days, it melts the glue, making it easy to peel off the tint on your car window.

Start by preparing the soap solution you will be using and fill the spray bottle. Cut some plastic bags that you will use to cover the tinted windows. Ensure the plastic wraps are large enough to fit your windows.

Spray the tinted side of the car window with ammonia solution and cover it with plastic bags. Do the same thing on the inner part and cover it with plastic. Let the plastic sit for about an hour to allow ammonia to dissolve the glue. The window tint should be easy to remove once you remove the plastic bags. Use a razor blade to remove your tint’s top or corner edges and peel it off.

After removing the tint, clean the leftover glue with ammonia and steel wool.

Use Soap and Scrape

The soap and scrape technique is perhaps the simplest way to take off window tints on your car. Prepare a soap solution and fill your spray bottle. Once done, soak the window to loosen the adhesive. Remove the edges using a razor blade or a knife. Peel off the tint gently as you continue spraying the soap solution. You may have to repeatedly scrape some sections since they might not come off immediately.

Typically, these DIY window tint removal methods are easy and don’t require any special equipment. After removing your window tint, ensure you clean the windows using a cleaner and dry them off using a towel.

Best Car Detailing Hacks

Knowing the best car detailing hacks can help you improve the look of your car. These detailing hacks also ensure that you spend less time cleaning your car, especially when it’s dirty on the outside. Here’s a look at these detailing tips you should consider.

Clean the Dusty Air Vents

With the help of a can of compressed air, it can be pretty easy to clean the dusty air vents. You can also use the can to clean small crevices that collect debris and dust. Clean these spaces the same way you would do while cleaning your keyboard.

Dust Your Dashboard With a Coffee Filer

A coffee filter is made of lint-free paper. Therefore, it’s an excellent choice for dusting your dashboard. Use this item when you don’t have a cloth to clean a dirty dashboard. Use a few drops of olive oil on the dirty surface and give it a nice polish.

Get Yourself a Power Polisher/Waxer

Polishing and waxing your car is a great way to give it a shiny look. However, you don’t want to spend countless hours doing this manually. One of the best car detailing hacks requires buying a power polisher/waxer. This machine will save you time and energy.

Use Baking Soda Toothpaste on the Headlights

Cleaning your car headlights is probably the last thing on your mind. However, you can get rid of the brown surfaces by using baking soda toothpaste. This paste is abrasive and will effectively clean your headlights.

Shine Your Dashboard with Olive Oil

As previously mentioned, you can shine your car’s dashboard using olive oil. Doing this can also help to prevent future cracking.

Cupcake Liners in Your Cupholders

Cupholders are known to collect stubborn dirt. To prevent this, use clean out the cupholders using an old toothbrush. After that, place silicone cupcake liners in these spaces. Over time, these liners will collect dirt that would have accumulated in the small areas. It makes it easy to clean your car since you will only have to remove the liners and replace them with new ones or rinse the cupcake liners and put them back in.

Buy Some Handy Wipes

You may have to deal with some messes which miss the cupholders. To ensure you’re prepared to deal with this mess, buy a pack of car cleaner wipes. They cost a few dollars and will keep your car’s interior neat.

Cover Your Back Seat

Consider covering your back seat if you have a furry friend you love to take on those long rides. Investing in a pet hammock can make a huge difference. It only takes a few seconds to keep it in place since it comes with handy buckles.

Keep Things Organized

If you have documents to store in your car, you should keep things organized using an organizer. Keeping all paperwork organized inside the vehicle will ensure you don’t have a messy environment to deal with.

With these car detailing hacks, it should be easy to clean your car and have a less chaotic environment.

10 Ways to Save on Auto Insurance 

The laundry list of expenses when it comes to vehicle ownership can seem never-ending. One expense that is a legal requirement to drive, but is something you hope to never need is car insurance.

You might have insurance through the same company you used since you started driving. And, you might be paying ever-increasing premiums. That doesn’t have to be the case. There are many ways to save money and keep great coverage.

One–Don’t Let Your Coverage Lapse

Letting your coverage lapse can have a significant impact on your premium. Not unlike how employers look at gaps in your employment history, insurance companies are leery of any gaps in coverage, especially the longer they are. On average, premiums increased by 8% with gaps shorter than 30 days. Longer than that, the average shoots up to a 35% increase.

Two–Bundling

Most major auto insurance companies also have branches or subsidiaries that handle homeowners, renters and/or other types of insurance. With nearly all of these, savings of between 5% and 25% can be found.

Three–Coverage

Take a close look at your specific policy coverages and see if it is at a level that makes sense to you. For example, if you are living in a dry area where lots of rocks or sand is thrown up by trucks, you might want to have more comprehensive coverage as you might be replacing windshields frequently. If you live in a wetter climate where that doesn’t happen as much, it might be worth it to save by not having so much coverage.

Four–Mileage

Many of the top insurance companies provide a discount of up to 10% for simply driving less. To get this discount might take a bit more work on your end, as some require either periodic reporting of mileages or signing up to have a beacon/sensor sent to you. Once you enroll in these programs, they are extremely easy and can save quite a bit of money.

Five–Accidents

Accidents happen. But in being extra diligent in trying to avoid them, your insurance rates will not increase because one and many companies will reward you for remaining accident-free for certain periods. Since nearly every policy requires  prompt reporting of accidents, the severity of the accident and who is at fault can have serious effects on your premium. 

Six–Defensive Driving

Another way to save that requires a bit more of an active role is to complete a Defensive Driving course. Nearly every insurance company offers a discount with proof of completion. Best of all, you can complete this online (be sure to check with your carrier to make sure they accept the program you find). Not only will this save you money, but the knowledge gained from the course might also keep you accident-free.

Seven–Your Car

This is something to consider when you are looking for a new car, but can also affect the one(s) you currently own. Request a few quotes based on the ages, makes, and models. Generally, the older the car, the lower the premium. If you have an existing policy, contact your agent to see if the premium can be “refreshed” with the current age of your vehicle.

Eight – Credit

Just like your ability to get a lower interest rate on lines of credit, the higher your credit score is, the more likely you are to find a lower premium. If you are working to restore or build your credit up, be sure to stay in contact with your agent as your score increases. (Beware the inquiry use may affect your score. Ask if it is a hard or soft (preferred) credit pull.)

Nine – Pay-In-Full

When shopping around, or researching within an existing policy, many companies offer discounts when a policy is paid in full for the coverage periods. Typically, this is six months or a year.

Ten – Your Age

If you are in your college years or around retirement, there might be a discount that you qualify for. Generally, younger drivers can qualify for discounts based on their grades. Older drivers (usually 55+) can qualify for up to 10% in savings.

What Do Car Smells Mean?

Although something chemical smelt when taking a trip doesn’t always mean you are in imminent danger, it’s always best to know what the most common odors mean and what you should do next…

Serious Smells…

If you detect a rotten egg smell it’s sulfur gas or hydrogen sulfide leaking from the catalytic converters or maybe the fuel filters. If the fluid in the filter isn’t changed it can create a rotten egg smell throughout the system.

A mold or mildew smell could be a problem with the air conditioner, possibly items like leaves or sweet wrappers blocking it. This may in turn lead to water flowing onto your carpets or mats. The air conditioner should be run every month or so for about two minutes, but most people forget—especially in the winter.

A strange syrupy or candy smell is the odor of the coolant, also known as ethylene gycol, the same substance used in antifreeze. It may mean that your car is in danger of overheating. It shouldn’t be driven but taken immediately to a repair shop.

The smell of smoke or burning oil is probably an oil leak. If the oil leak hits the exhaust a fire will result, so it’s vital that this is dealt with immediately.

Should you encounter something similar to burnt paper especially when moving the gears could be the result of pressing down the clutch pedal too much. Not many people know that the clutch is sensitive to overuse and as a result could fail.

Burning plastic may be a short circuit, for example a wire being worn down, or alternately, chewed by a small animal. Another explanation would be an item such as a plastic bag entering the exhaust. It’s best to take it to be repaired as both of these are too dangerous to be dealt with by most regular car owners.

A smell of gas a long time after you fill the tank should be cause for concern. Sometimes gasoline does spill onto shoes, coats etc. so it’s always best to check. It could be something like a faulty gas cap or fuel injector. As always, it’s best to take it to the garage.

If you can smell what seems like the exhaust when you are sitting in the car the best thing to do is to roll down your window and take it to the garage immediately.

Lifestyle Smells…

Here are some handy hints to remove smells which you may encounter in everyday use, apart from the item most commonly used–air freshener hanging from the rear-view mirror!

A smell from the car’s carpet may be removed by a car vacuum, especially if it has steam clean or a wash function.

Baking powder shouldn’t be placed on the upholstery for instance but placed in a bowl and left in the car overnight to attack any smells in the vicinity.

Those tumble dryer sheets can do miracles if it’s a hot day. Just leave a couple in the back window to replace smells and leave a fresh scent. Or you could use a freshly washed cushion or towel, as long as you remember to remove it after about a day.

A water and vinegar mixture can remove the smell of vomit – and remove it with a vinegar smell but pick your battles, eh!

So now that you’ve cleared your car of bad “lifestyle” smells, you have no excuse to miss an odor that indicates a mechanical issue.

The Choice of Paintwork for Cars

How do you change the color of your car?

First, you could choose another solid hue.

This is reasonably easy, solid finishes only take three layers; the primer, the paint itself and finally the lacquer. This may be achieved in what is known as a “two-pack” where the paint and the lacquer is mixed together. There aren’t that many colors to choose from, just the usual red, black or blue.

Mixing Colors:

Most people don’t consider a mixing of colors and for good reason, it only works by placing light colors on top of dark ones, such as blue on top of black. And it’d be hard to keep to the same color, it will alter over time or through a repainting.

A problem that could occur if you’re not careful is layers separating creating a peel. These are caused by moisture entering the paint in the application process. Because people don’t like applying paint indoors it is a common occurrence, the only alternative is to apply the paint on a non-misty day.

Best Color:

The best solid color to paint the car is gray or silver as it doesn’t show the dirt as much as black or white. But even a gray car needs the occasional polish to make it presentable. Well, if it’s your pride and joy it makes sense to keep it in presentable condition.

Finishes:

Matte finish paint needs a special polish and shampoo when cleaning the car. Certain marks can create a permanent effect, for instance bird droppings, and should be dealt with straight away.

Another option is metallic finishes, providing a brighter shine than a solid color which is created by having aluminium or similar flakes in the paint. Unfortunately, it doesn’t add that much value to the car, so it’s only really done for cosmetic reasons. The refraction is best seen on a sunny day, though even when the skies are overcast it still creates a strong effect. There are further down sides to these types of paint as they show the dirt more and can make repairs more difficult.

Wraps:

Because a matte finish requires a number of products such as polishes in order to keep it free from blemishes a compromise might be to use a vinyl wrap. Using something like a car wash may still be out of the question though. The advantage of wraps is that you can simply redo the entire wrap without too much effort or expense.

The Best Answer:

The best type of paint is pearlescent, but this can be hard to purchase from the mainstream names. The pearlescent effect is caused by little pieces of ceramic which both reflect and refract natural light. As with metallic paint it does tend to show the dirt. Again, there’s not that many colors to choose from but pearlescent is a mixture of colors really so it makes no difference.

A Final Note on Cleaning:

When looking at shampoos one idea is to consider other people with a similar car such as yours. After all they will know what works with that type of paint.

Probably in custom painting your car you’re presenting yourself with problems further down the line. Whenever you get into a fender bender you will have to custom match that paint on the new panel. But if you’ve got the time it will definitely increase the look and the value of your car.

Is Your Car Ready For Fall Driving?

Cooler weather is finally here. You’ve brought out your sweaters and jackets and stored your summer attire. Your wardrobe is all set to enjoy the crisp, cool days but what about your vehicle? Is your car ready for cooler-weather driving?

If you’re not sure if your vehicle’s ready or aren’t sure what needs to be done, here are a few things you’ll want to take care of before you hit the open roads this fall.

How to Get Your Car Ready for Fall Driving

1. Give Your Car a Bath

Chances are your summer driving routes took you to a beach, at least once. Whether it’s sand from a freshwater lake or salt from the ocean air, you’ll want to rinse it off before you start any fall road trips. The salt, sand, and other grime from summer drives can collect on the vehicle’s undercarriage. If left on too long, it can cause corrosion.

To prevent this from happening, rinse all of the salt and other grime off your car. A garden hose can be just as effective as a car wash.

2. Check Tire Pressure

Did you know that every time the temperature fluctuates 10 degrees your tire pressure changes as much as one pound per square inch? This means that when the temperature changes you want to check tire pressure.

If you’re not sure what is recommended for your vehicle, optimal tire pressure will be listed in the owner’s manual. You can also look your vehicle up online or ask a mechanic if the manual is lost.

3. Replace Windshield Wiper Blades

You might not have to replace the windshield wiper blades if they weren’t used during heavy spring and summer downpours. However, if you spent a lot of time parked at the beach the salt air can corrode the rubber blades.

It is recommended that you change the blades every six months. Drivers in colder climates may want to plan on replacing them every fall. The last thing you want is to find out your windshield wipers aren’t effective in the middle of a rain or snowstorm.

4. Check the Oil and Filter

Checking your oil levels should be a part of your regular car maintenance. Depending on the type of oil used, mileage, and driving conditions, it might not need to be changed. If it’s measuring low and still looks clear, it’s okay to just add to the existing oil.

If it’s time to change the oil, often to a lighter-weight one, you also want to replace the filter. Lighter oils are often recommended for fall driving since it can help the engine perform more efficiently in cooler temperatures. A new filter can do what a dirty one can’t; keep the oil clean and debris out of the engine.

5. Change the Air Filter

The air filter is an important component and it’s often overlooked. It prevents dust and other small impurities from entering the cylinders’ combustion chambers. This can lower fuel efficiency and reduce engine performance. Like your oil filter, it should be changed every six months.

6. Flush the Cooling System

Your vehicle’s cooling system should be flushed and refilled every 2-years or 24,000 miles. It’s part of good car maintenance and an easy item to add to your spring car maintenance checklist.

You will need a radiator cleaning product to flush away oil, grease, and collected sediment. After flushing the radiator, refill with a mixture of water and coolant. The percentage of water and coolant will depend on the climate. Severe climates require a higher mixture of coolant than water.

7. Check the Spark Plugs and Battery

This is something you should already be doing regularly. Checking the battery and connections helps ensure that you won’t be stranded. Make sure that the connections are tight and that there aren’t any signs of corrosion. You also want to make sure that the battery housing is solid.

The final thing you want to do before heading off on your first fall drive of the season is to clean out the car’s interior.

Dealing with Rust in Cars

Why does it happen? In older cars it can mean that scratches went untreated or that a below average paint sub was left in the weather with no protective coat of wax for too many years. BUT why do newer cars rust?

You may have noticed some rust on your car, which feels out of place because your car just isn’t that old. Well there are several reasons for this, but generally it’s the result of something that happened, or didn’t happen, during the production of the vehicle.

Most newer cars don’t get a rust problem, but it’s such a pain to deal with let’s look at it in this post.

It’s the places we don’t see which tend to be where problems flare up. One factor that causes the underside and the wheel wells to rust is that this area gets a lot of exposure. Rainwater falls on your car and runs off, but water in puddles on the road get picked up and thrown up into the car from underneath as long as the roads are wet.

However, all cars get exposed to rain so why do some rust? The second factor is a lack of under-sealing. Under-sealing is essentially a coat of paint, which doesn’t have to look good, it just covers the raw metal preventing rust.

You most often hear the term under-sealing from a car salesperson, but it’s a real thing. It might seem like they’re charging you for something and then waving a magic wand over the car, but mechanics do recommend an under-seal. Its factory standard for most cars made in the US, but imported cars are hit and miss. Japan in particular often skips the undercoat as they have milder winters and want the buyer to have the option of saving the money. Under-sealing is particularly vital to make sure that cars don’t rust underneath the trim and bumpers, and the wheel-arches. This tough pain cope with road chippings.

A third factor in auto rust is if salt is used as a deicer in winters, or if you drive on rough roads. Rough roads can expose areas of your suspension that aren’t really made to sit out in the open. Even if this is temporary it can introduce dirty water to these parts, which will act abrasively to create areas that eventually rust.

Vehicles which travel through salty water are more likely to rust because the salt will act on metals such as nickel and chromium. Cars with an underside of metals such as aluminium and magnesium are less likely to rust, which are generally modern cars. It’s the steel chassis which are the pain.

Prevention

To help prevent this you should wash behind the tires using clean, soapy water. Applying a pipe cleaner to hard-to-reach areas is also a plus. If there is an excess of paint or putty substance on the underside use sandpaper or an abrasive wheel to remove it.

Although pressure washers use massive amounts of water, they can also damage the underside and should be done sparingly.

Even when you get your undercarriage sealed.

The coating may get chipped when a person jacks up your car who doesn’t know what they’re doing.

Some “underseals” are a type of thick wax, which will prevent rust by denying air and water to the metal parts. It generally prevents rust but could melt in hot weather or be washed away too much water on the underside of the vehicle.

When you discover rust.

It’s best to start by cleaning surfaces like the wheelarch with a wire brush to remove flaking rust. Then apply a rust converter with a paintbrush for the best results.

Bitumen is a traditional patch for a rusty area, but it’s really inferior for a couple reasons. It doesn’t last that long. It should be applied with gloves and masks. It’s awkward to remove the excess. When dry it turns into a brittle substance and is liable to break off.

Some old-school mechanics will apply grease or old engine oil to problem areas. The problem is that this drip on the road and cause a hassle for motorcyclists and other road users.

When you have a classic car you will just have to face it, you will have to deal with tricky things like rust. It’s just one of those annoying things in life.

Car Power – Used for the House?

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One of the problems with an electric car is the cost of building up the right amount of power. With home electricity sky-rocketing people might wish they could run their house off the car’s battery in a pinch, but that cannot be done just yet.

For a second let’s suspend the fact that you buy your car so you can drive it, not run the battery dead powering your house.

When power is shut down, nothing in the house will work. And there are hundred reasons for a power outage: wild fires, seasonal winds and so on. So there is a market for alternatives.

The technical name for such power is a bi-directional battery, one that works with two objectives in mind. It gives the customer more choice, but it does ramp the prices up.

There is enough electricity in a car to power a house but getting it out is the problem. The difficulty is that houses are so plugged into the grid that it becomes the default setting; creating any generator that would power the house outside the main system would present a difficulty.

The power company would treat a power line as a cut, even if the house is simply switched over to battery for a time, and someone would try and repair it. It seems overzealous but the reality is that generators are set to kick in when the grid is down, so the houses aren’t built to toggle back and forth from grid to local generation.

There’s a problem with the current too. The battery is DC powered and the grid is AC powered, so you need a way to convert this (also known as inverting this). Some nerd needs to come up with a way for a car to discharge its power to act as a battery back up to a house in an emergency.

In recent years we’ve seen people go to their car to charge their cell phones when the grid is down. Why isn’t this possible on a slightly larger scale? Why couldn’t your hybrid act as a whole house generator?

There’s an access conflict too. Only a certain number of people can access the electricity grid and any new rules need to be regulated fairly. There are laws on the books that say if your home generation system, think solar panels on the roof, generate more power than your home is using, that the local PUD must buy the excess from you. So it’s possible to sell back power.

So for emergencies it might be a nice option and there are number of players who are looking at the concept. The people at Nissan are looking at developing a project in Copenhagen and there is an office in Chile actually pulling power from a car to conduct business. It’s just doing it on a large scale which is the headache.

Enter the experimental Den Do Drive House by Mitsubishi. The company’s goal is to create a more efficient electric ecosystem, where power can be generated locally when possible and off grid when not, then stored in a house battery or the cars battery as needed. So there would be times when the car would be feeding power back to the house to avoid buying grid power. Why? Well the grid gets its energy from a number of different sources. Some more cost effective and some which are deemed “renewable.” The cost per KW hour varies because power is sourced in response to demand.

The local power company currently negotiates rate in bulk and then resells the power to users at a consistent price, but in the bulk market electricity is bought and sold based on demand and availability. In the past, availability was steady from sources like nuclear power or coal plants, and seasonal from dams. However, wind power varies continuously and unpredictably. The thing most users don’t understand is that there is no giant battery out there storing up wind energy for the times the wind isn’t blowing. Why not? Because the laws of physics prevent such a device from working.

Enter the Mitsubishi Dendo Drive House. If entire developments were to each have local generation and local storage of power, its possible for rate payers to share in the hourly rate swing of power costs and using their smart home, sort of game the system to minimize their liability. It would pay for itself over a number of decades. It just isn’t a short term solution to cheaper electricity bills. The installation of the house will all be done by Mitsubishi and is cost inhibitive unless some sort of government grant enters the scene.

So the while the Dendo Drive house may be a long-shot, only practical in a true energy crisis, a bidirectional switch with local house battery storage could come in handy when the grid goes down. It could let your keep the lights on in your home for a few hours…until your gas tank runs dry.

 

Installing a Sunroof

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What most of us generally think of as a “sunroof” is more accurately called a “moon-roof.” Is the distinction important or just a selling pitch? It depends. The difference is actually the level of tint in the glass. So the short cut to thinking about it is that a moon-roof tends to have a sliding transparent glass panel, rather than something opaque, or with built-in SPF. What used to be called a sunroof isn’t all that popular at the moment, though it is not clear why.

It comes down to whether you need more natural light inside your vehicle or if doing so has brought in too much heat. So one possible explanation for the latest craze of moon-roofs is this. Minivans and SUV’s have a lot of windows and easily over heat the passenger space, but also have and area for the moon-roof to be where it won’t shine a ton of direct light onto any of the people in the vehicle. So with modern air conditioning no one really notices the extra work the engine does to keep it cool.

Another reason is that its possible to add tint to a moon-roof aftermarket without impacting any warranties you might have on your vehicle. So manufacturers, who don’t know how hot or cold your climate is can send them all out with clear glass and count on your dealer to offer tinting services if that’s a hot add-on in your climate.

Adding a Sunroof

Speaking of manufacturer warranties, if your car feels too hot and/or stuffy it might seem tempting to install the sunroof, especially if you have some experience with auto repairs. Be warned though that a hobby mechanic shouldn’t attempt to create a sunroof to a “normal” car (this would just create leaks and even cause damage to the interior) and would also void any warranties you might have.

Assuming you are not a hobby mechanic there are several types of sunroofs you might look at:

A pop-up sunroof is the least expensive type of sunroof. In a similar way that a house window can be kept open using a latch, the pop-up sunroof is kept in place using a hinge.

A Sliding sunroof is the more general type of sunroof, again they have a latch system but the window doesn’t rise up.

An electronic sunroof tends to be a more expensive of type of sliding roof which can be operated by the driver of the vehicle.

The first thing that needs to be done is the measure the square space on your roof. It has to be the flat part of the roof. Using the curved spaces would make for a much more expensive sunroof and most commercial sunroofs tend only to use the flat part.

Next you need to purchase a sunroof kit. For best results, chose a sunroof which is an inch smaller (that’s what the instructions say but a square inch smaller would make more sense?) than your maximum dimensions. A complete kit includes a full template, weather proofing and even wiring (if you are creating an electric sunroof).

Don’t even think about doing it from scratch—just buy a kit. Besides if you are serious about it, you probably should study pictures and look at all the steps in greater detail, which comes with the kit.

Time to Complete Installation

With proper tools, this task surprisingly takes only 60 to 90 minutes, which you might think it is a comparatively short time, but if you think about it, it doesn’t involve the engine or making “major” changes to the bodywork (such as might be needed in the case of an accident). It’s just complicated.

As placing a sunroof in a car cost about $1,000 it might seem like a cheaper option to do it yourself but consider these three benefits to hiring a professional.

  • They already have the tools and training to do it.
  • They will get it done more quickly and if they don’t, they have to keep it out of the weather.
  • You can’t KNOW that you did it wrong until months later when your interior is ruined overnight.

Perhaps the best option is buying a car with a sunroof? It’s an excuse to get a new car, in any case.

 

The Squeeze – How to Get The Most of Car Space

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You may not be aware of the term “cargo space,” though it’s just a more complicated way of saying trunk space. A similar term used in the motor trade is “cargo capacity” which means the same thing.

Looking at the objects that people put it trunks in the movies it tends to be suitcases, cooler boxes, items like that. Everything you might need for a week or a fortnight away, though the items we’ll need to place in our trunks could be yard trash, a table, chairs… Well, you get the idea.

A way to increase the space is to have storage in the front of the vehicle, as Tesla does. This wouldn’t be possible in a conventional vehicle but because the Tesla is electric the engine doesn’t take up that much space. They nickname this new space as the “frunk,” a portmanteau of “front trunk”.

trunk-1478832_1920As well as the front space, you might look at the under-trunk space, although in most cars this is where the spare tire is stored. Minivans, however, often only use part of the underfloor to store the tire leaving part for additional storage.

Minivans aren’t alone in touting their ample surplus of space. The makers of the Pontiac boast that you could fit a whole mattress in the trunk of their car. This might be too much space for most people, how often do you wish to transport a mattress? But if you require space this is probably the ideal car to get.

When you have space you might like to utilize it in bizarre new ways.

Are you unhappy with the car’s current speakers? No problem, get yourself a huge pair of subwoofers and stick them in your trunk. Okay, you no longer have half your trunk space, but it does improve your listening pleasure.

Got a couple bikes to transport? You have two basic choices—inside or out. You can install a bike rack on the roof or the trunk, depending on your car’s body type. For those who have yet to purchase a bike rack or wish to carry more than one the bicycle can be a tricky thing to transport. One idea is to use a foldaway bike which not only allows you to store the bike but also, depending on the size of the vehicle, allows room for rucksacks and other items needed for your travels.

If you are someone who needs to look immaculate all the time as you travel around the country you might like to transform your trunk into a walk-in closet complete with space for jackets to be hung up, shoes and ties.

If you are worried about items being broken in the trunk, obtaining a trunk shelf might be the answer, allowing items like eggs and so on to remain in one place and not get crushed by other items. For minivans, a cargo net can be a lifesaver.

A number of the items above may seem like late April Fools but they are available on the internet. Anywhere there is empty space, someone’s going to have an idea of how to fill it.