Just for Fun 27

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Car Gorilla Adverts

Op-Ed By Wimsett

Guerrilla marketing for cars seems to suggest too many young guns given too much money. If it’s to show how wonderful the car is, that’s all to the good, but a weird idea doesn’t automatically sell the car. You need to think about your advertising in greater detail.

It’s not as if you can replace each billboard with a guerrilla campaign, it’s something you can only do in huge built up areas. And as suggested above, it’s a bit hit and miss.

However it does give a humorous direction to tempt potential buyers, particularly those who don’t respond to TV or radio adverts or even those Facebook adverts. In other words, advertisements for people who don’t respond, or feel they don’t respond to mainstream commercials.

Some campaigns do seem better than others, Honda’s “The Power of Dreams” seems memorable. But a large funnel of knickknacks going into a back of a box containing a Honda doesn’t necessarily work.

It does tend to be the more expensive cars such as a huge monster hand coming from nowhere holding a BMW or a Mercedes Benz apparently crashing through a poster. Maybe you remember an Alfa Romeo in a tiny shopping cart (held in place by ropes) or a SEAT, S.A. in a large plastic box where it is slightly obscured? No?

Then there was the mini cooper campaign which showed a conveyor belt with baggage coming out of it or a Renault in a giant snow globe. Or things like a car held in place by a giant bike lock or an upside-down car apparently being held in place by chewing gums. Then you have Smart Cars apparently being dispensed by a giant vending machine. Ideas about size and having the car at funny angles seem to play a part in most of these guerrilla ideas.

You might like an idea which includes technology and access to information as this is what 70% of car users are interested in. Could it be turned into a video? Video is what convinced 61% of potential buyers to buy a car in 2019. It makes sense-a moving image is much more convincing than a stunt in a mall.

What are we supposed to make of these ideas? There could be a link to economy in design with the vending machine or the giant bike lock ideas, you’re buying these because it’s a small car. The conveyor belt idea meanwhile must surely indicate a spacious trunk. Or the snow globe a celebration of the Christmas season as well as an advertisement for the car. Most ideas do seem a bit of a mishmash.

It should be pointed out that there is difficulty in coming up with a campaign to indicate a family car or a car for the older market. In these cases, your best bet is to rely on traditional advertising techniques.

Despite this young buck feeling of using obscure ideas and concepts there must be something profitable occurring or else it wouldn’t continue. It goes without saying that just because a crazy ad catches your eye, doesn’t mean you buy the car without further research.

Best of the Web: VW Bus

We’ve been digging up some vehicles from the past that are iconic in representing freedom and open road. Please enjoy some videos and facts about the VW Bus.

The Volkswagen Type 2, known officially (depending on body type) as the TransporterKombi or Microbus, or, informally, as the Bus (US) or Camper (UK), Pão de Forma (Loaf of Bread) (Portugal) is a forward control light commercial vehicle introduced in 1950 by the German automaker Volkswagen as its second car model. Following – and initially deriving from – Volkswagen’s first model, the Type 1 (Beetle), it was given the factory designation Type 2.

As one of the forerunners of the modern cargo and passenger vans, the Type 2 gave rise to forward control competitors in the United States in the 1960s, including the Ford Econoline, the Dodge A100, and the Chevrolet Corvair 95 Corvan, the latter adapting the rear-engine configuration of the Corvair car in the same manner in which the VW Type 2 adapted the Type 1 layout.

Unlike other rear engine Volkswagens, which evolved constantly over time but never saw the introduction of all-new models, the Transporter not only evolved, but was completely revised periodically with variations retrospectively referred to as versions “T1” to “T5” (a nomenclature only invented after the introduction of the front-drive T4 which replaced the T25). However, only generations T1 to T3 (or T25 as it is still called in Ireland and Great Britain) can be seen as directly related to the Beetle (see below for details)[citation needed].

The Type 2, along with the 1947 Citroën H Van, are among the first ‘forward control’ vans in which the driver was placed above the front roadwheels. They started a trend in Europe

An ambulance model was added in December 1951 which re-positioned the fuel tank in front of the transaxle, put the spare tire behind the front seat, and added a “tailgate“-style rear door. These features became standard on the Type 2 from 1955 to 1967. 11,805 Type 2s were built in the 1951 model year

Stars of the Car TV Shows

Bogi Lateiner

One category of “Reality TV” is car shows on cable. Although many people watch car shows just to see the latest vehicles, or to see some engineering in action, many are still drawn to the presenters and the reality TV stars of these shows.

How did they manage to wangle such a sweet job?

Danny Koker

Danny Koker the star of Counting Cars owns a recording studio called Count’s Customs, and a bar called Count’s Vamp’d Bar and Grill where he also performs. He is based in Las Vegas.

Bogi Lateiner is the star of All Girl’s Garage and Bogi’s Garage. Away from the show she teaches car maintenance to women across the country. Bogi is short for Boglarka, her Hungarian name but she is usually called Sarah.

Wayne Carini

Wayne Carini takes part in a documentary called Chasing Classic Cars. He owns a collision repair and restoration business in Connecticut and has always had an interest in vintage cars. He has assumed the role of grand marshals at the Klingberg Vintage Motorcar Festival over several years. He has also taken an active part in the charity Autism Speaks.  

Jesse James

The star of Monster Garage and Motorcycle Mania is Jesse James. James worked as a bodyguard before getting into welding and fabricating and also owned the Cisco Burger restaurant and even a girls’ fashion line called Jesse’s Girl. He also has appeared in the second season of Celebrity Apprentice.

Ray Evernham hosts the Velocity show AmeriCARna. As well as being a NASCAR race driver he has also worked as an expert in automobiles chassis. He created Evernham Motorsports which has since been sold.

Jay Leno

Jay Leno is best known for hosting Jay Leno, which had been the Tonight Show, where he got his TV big break guest appearing. Along with other TV and movie work, Jay Leno took part in a show (Jay Leno’s Garage) where he takes out one of his many cars for a drive along the California bays. Before Jay Leno and the Tonight Show Jay’s lifestyle was almost completely funded by his stand-up comedy. More recently he’s acted regularly in the show Last Man Standing, and along with his long time wife, helped a number of different charities.

John H Davis, the presenter Motorweek has a long history of motor journalism and has even won an Emmy. He helped found the North American Car and Truck of the Year Awards and to add to that helped organize the Washington Automotive Press Association. Like Jay Leno he has a number of high performance cars in his garage.

Lisa Kelly appeared on the History Channel’s Ice Road Truckers, she was the first female trucker to appear on the series. She has also driven school buses and rode motocross bikes (becoming a freestyle champion). Kelly attended Cornerstone University in Michigan for a while but didn’t graduate.

Mike Brewer

Mike Brewer is featured in Fast ‘N’ Loud a strange reality show with added sketches. His early life had him attending motor shows and after that did a number of jobs from paramedic to firefighter. He has appeared in adverts for Dodge Cars as well as creating the Gas Monkey Bar ‘N’ Grill.

The moral is here is that there is no sure path to hosting a car show, but if you want to fund your service station or car collection get on television as soon as!

PS If you know of a sure path to hosting a car show, give us a call, let’s talk.

Cars in Tintin.

“Herge’s Adventures of Tintin!” began the famous cartoon. Herge, whose real name was George Remi, certainly loved to draw cars and made sure they were full of intricate detail. It would take an age to show all the cars that featured in his books. Here is just a selection.

When drawing a car your mind goes into what makes a car a car. It’s the radiator, the color of the hub, the shape of the doors, the shape of the headlights (many are more than just round, they might have some decoration at the top) and so on. Some cars like a Peugeot 202 and a Land Rover which feature in the comics have a visible spare wheel at the back. It gives much more of a background style to the piece.

It’s not about drawing stationary cars, you need to look at movement. This is not about showing smoke coming out of an engine, a Lancia for example is shown which all wheels off the ground as if it going over bumpy terrain. A quick way of doing it was a squiggle shown next to car as if the car isn’t going to be at that point for very long.

The Model T Ford from Tintin in the Congo shows its distinctive canopy, side plates and visible axels.

Many cars seem to date from the 1930s, maybe this is where Tintin is meant to be set. Even comics which seem to be set in the 1960s, such as Destination Moon, include both a blue Dodge and blue Ford both manufactured in 1949.

Sadly not all the cars can be linked to real cars. There are number of cars in Tintin in America which are long enough to be Chevrolets, but not quite the pattern, the coloring is all wrong for instance. The cars driven in the part set in Chicago seem to have noticeable fenders, but there’s not that much which distinguishes them from other cars.

With a book like The Black Island you can see a noticeable love of British cars. Those who have watched the UK series Morse cannot help but recognize the hood of the Jaguar, in this case a Mark X.

Because the type of car dates a comic, when filming a book, many vehicles were replaced by other ones. Thomson and Thompson were shown driving a Peugot 201 in Black Gold, but that was changed to a Jeep.

The Calculus Affair is the comic book which features the most cars, including French cars such as 2CV (which is still recognisable as such despite being in a crashed state) and the Citroen 15 which has a noticeable sheen to the black paint.

With 205 vehicles to choose from, this is a gigantic subject and there is much more to say on the matter, including the advert that Herges made about Citroen cars. In the meantime check out François de Dardel’s website for a number of images from the comic books for a complete picture on the subject.