Is Driving A Tesla Really Maintenance Free?

Teslas are often advertised as being maintenance-free, but is that the case? Although Teslas do not require scheduled maintenance, like oil changes and tune-ups, some maintenance tasks still need to be performed.

For example, the brakes on a Tesla will wear out over time and need to be replaced. The tires will also need to be regularly inspected and rotated. In addition, the battery pack will gradually lose its capacity over time and eventually need to be replaced.

For one thing, Teslas require less frequent maintenance than traditional gasoline-powered cars. Teslas have far fewer moving parts thanks to their electric motors than conventional cars, which means there are fewer opportunities for something to break down.

As a result, owners can expect to save money on repairs and maintenance over the life of their vehicles. In addition, Teslas also have much lower fuel costs than gas-powered cars. Although the initial purchase price of a Tesla may be higher than that of a traditional vehicle, owners can expect to save money in the long run, thanks to lower operating costs.

What kind of maintenance is required for a Tesla?

Teslas are designed for minimal maintenance, and many owners report infrequent trips to the service center. The first is to keep the interior and exterior clean. This will help to protect the paint and prevent dirt and debris from damaging the car’s finish. The second is to check the tire pressure and tread depth regularly. Proper tire inflation and tread depth are essential for safety and fuel efficiency.

Finally, it is essential to have the vehicle’s software updated regularly. Software updates can add new features and improve performance, so it is necessary to stay up-to-date. Tesla vehicles require very little maintenance, but paying attention to the car’s needs is still crucial.

What are some common problems with Teslas?

Teslas can have its fair share of maintenance problems like any other car. One common issue is that electric motors involve reliability, particularly during hot weather or when the vehicle is used for long-distance driving.

Another problem is that the batteries can lose their charge relatively quickly, frustrating owners who are used to gas-powered cars with much longer ranges.

Additionally, the high-tech nature of Tesla vehicles can sometimes result in glitches with the infotainment system or other digital features. Software problems are not new for tesla owners, as sometimes you’ll be forced to perform computer reboots to correct a few minor issues.

While these problems can be frustrating, they are usually relatively easy to fix and should not deter potential buyers from considering a Tesla.

Teslas are marketed as being maintenance-free, but this is not the case. While there may be less work that needs to be done on Teslas than on classic cars, they still require some maintenance.

If you’re considering buying a Tesla, it’s essential to know that they require some maintenance, and it’s not quite as “maintenance-free” as the company would have you believe.

Do Teslas Really not have ANY oil in them?

I would be hard to believe a vehicle can run with no lubricant. And you’d be right to be suspicious. The marketing claim is that they don’t need traditional oil changes, which is not the same thing as being oil free. They have “gear boxes,” which is their version of a transmission, which requires lubricant.

5 Car Maintenance Myths

Car owners have heard many times about the best way to maintain their vehicles in good condition. Most people get advice related to engine power, fuel efficiency, and overall car longevity. While some tips seem like practical ways of enhancing your car’s performance or keeping it in shape, most of the maintenance tips are nothing but myths. Here’s a look at the top 5 car maintenance myths.

1. You should change your engine oil after every 3,000 miles

You’ve probably heard it before from your friends or even your mechanic that you should consider changing your engine oil every 3,000 miles. It’s not surprising that certain oil companies are still pushing for the same idea.

However, most modern cars can run up to 7,500 miles before an oil change. Technological advances have helped to develop superior engine designs and better chemical composition of oils. These improvements have helped cars to go for longer miles before oil changes.

2. Premium fuel will increase your car’s performance

Unless your car has an engine that gets hotter or has a high compression, standard gasoline is okay. Even the cheaper 86 octane fuel must meet the required quality standards. Therefore, you can be sure it won’t affect your car’s performance.

3. Servicing your car at different service centers voids its warranty

Manufacturers will recommend specific service centers you can turn to in case your vehicle needs maintenance. A common myth is that going to other service centers will void your vehicle’s warranty. But this is far from the truth.

You can repair your car at any service station without hampering your warranty. What you need to ensure is to have all the receipts for repair expenses in case they are required for further inspection and compensation.

4. You should replace all four tires

Most car owners also believe they should replace all four tires even when others still have good grip and treads. However, this is another car maintenance myth you should be wary of.

The reality is that you don’t need to incur unnecessary expenses just to replace all four tires. You simply need to check the tire depth and confirm that your wheels haven’t outlived their lifespans. When replacing your tires, ensure you choose the right size, model, and depth for increased durability.

5. Warm your car engine before driving off

Perhaps you’ve been warming your car before driving it in the cold weather. How true is this myth?

Well, it turns out that modern cars warm up faster. Another thing is that other car parts like transmission and wheel bearings warm up once the car is in motion. So, there isn’t any advantage gained by taking a few minutes to warm your vehicle before driving away.

Idling your car uses gas. You’ll be wasting time and money waiting for it to heat up.

Generally, knowing that these car maintenance myths are actually not true helps to ensure you use and maintain your car as required.

What To Expect When Your Mechanic Makes a House Call

Mechanics have simplified the process of getting car repair services. You no longer need to drive your car to the mechanic to get it fixed. Now, mechanics are going rounds making house calls. Therefore, besides the convenience of having your car fixed right from your doorstep, there’s a lot more you should expect with door-to-door car repair services.

Car Care Made Easy

Driving your vehicle to get it fixed is always a hassle. This sometimes means paying an extra fee to tow it to the nearest service center or a mechanic you trust. With car repair services delivered to your home or office, you will save a lot on additional expenses that you could have alternatively incurred.

Once you book an appointment, the mechanic will arrive with all the required gear to fix your car. You need to provide the mechanic with enough parking space or driveway. To ensure you don’t forget about the appointment, your mechanic or service center will send you a reminder a day before the appointment.

During the specific day when your vehicle should be fixed, your mechanic will send you another reminder that they are on their way. If you’re not around your home or office, you can notify the mechanic where to collect your car keys and fix your car while you’re away.

Your mechanic will strive to keep time, so you should expect them to arrive within the scheduled time. Avoid driving your car during this time so the engine cools down for effective repairs.

If you’re present during the house call, you can use this opportunity to ask your mechanic about any mechanical issues with your car. You also don’t have to worry about disposing of old replaced parts of your car since your mechanic can do this for you.

What You Get

After inspecting your account, your report will be recorded in your account. The report details essential safety items like car engine codes, brakes, filters, fluid levels, tire treads, belts, etc. You can easily access your report at any time. This allows you to maintain your car in good condition to serve you better.

Your mechanic will then bill you for services rendered. You can choose your preferred payment method and won’t be billed until you’re satisfied with the car repair services. Depending on your payment method, your mechanic will send you a digital receipt and update your data on their platform. This helps you to track your car repair expenses and budget for them in the future.

When your mechanic makes a house call, they can send you maintenance reminders from time to time. Plus, you can manage your vehicle online. You get to schedule appointments and review any services your car needs to function at its best.

Car maintenance is easier than ever before, especially now that your mechanic can provide door-to-door services the ‘Uber-style. Therefore, apart from convenience, you can be confident that your car will always be well maintained.

The Ins and Outs of Car Warranties

Whether it’s a new or used car, the cost of maintenance and repairs can be quite high. One way car owners hope to save money is by purchasing an auto warranty. With so many options for warranties, trying to weed through the varying terms and conditions can feel like a daunting task.

With warranties for either new or used vehicles, there are just a few main keywords and options to look out for to make sure you are saving money by the plan covering some costs of repairs but also not losing money by paying for plan options you don’t need.

Types of Warranty Coverages

Regardless of being a factory warranty or one purchased through a third-party vendor, there are certain terms for the plans, that are similar. Check the terms and conditions specific to your plan to ensure you know what you are paying for and what support you can expect when repairs are needed.

Powertrain Warranty

As the name implies, powertrain warranties generally cover everything in the drive-system of the car, from the motor to the wheel axles. These types of warranties most often have a shorter term than others. However, since it covers vital engine components such as seals and gaskets, they may prove to be a wallet-saver if any covered part fails.

Bumper-To-Bumper

The bumper-to-bumper warranty is the most comprehensive of warranty plan types, and is commonly called, an “exclusionary plan.” In short, a bumper-to-bumper warranty covers everything as the name implies, including most mechanical, electrical, and other high-tech components.

The terms of these types of warranties generally list conditions or components that are not covered, rather than what is covered. These exclusions usually include general wear and tear, damage caused by an accident or collision, or any damage or component failure due to the installation or use of aftermarket parts.

Other Warranty Types

While Bumper-To-Bumper and Powertrain warranties are the most common types, other more miscellaneous coverages might be worth exploring.

Depending on which state you live in, the Department of Motor Vehicles may require yearly or periodic emissions testing. If this is the case, an Emissions Performance or an Emissions Defect warranty may cover you if any emissions-system-related part fails.

For the body of the car, you may have the option of purchasing or adding a Corrosion Warranty. While these generally do not cover damage caused by environmental factors, such as acid rain, they usually cover corrosion of the sheet metal body skin due to material defects.

Warranty Vendors

Along with options for coverage, there are also options for who sells the warranty. This generally is dependent on the age of the vehicle and whether it is new or used.

Factory Warranties

Generally, the easiest route for auto warranties is to have a factory warranty. For both new cars, manufacturers each have their term limits for bumper-to-bumper and powertrain warranties, with many offering longer terms as a marketing strategy. However, these are generally limited to the first owner of the vehicle.

Even if your car is used, it may be covered by a factory extended warranty, commonly called a Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) warranty. Along with the standard factory warranty, each manufacturer will have its own CPO warranty terms.

Independent Extended Warranties

Depending on the age of the vehicle, it might not be eligible for a factory warranty or even a CPO warranty. There is still an option for coverage. Many companies, independent of auto manufacturers, offer extended warranties that may offer similar coverages, with some plans covering up to 250,000 miles.

Cost

If there is an option for a factory warranty when purchasing a car, it is generally a good investment to add on. This is specially true during the break-in period or if it is a new model. However, an independent extended warranty, should be compared to the average annual cost for repairs for your car brand.

DIY Detail vs. Paying a Professional

Second to purchasing an entirely different or new car, there is not much that can replace a detailed cleaning to reinvigorate the bond with your car. Above just driving through an automatic carwash and simple vacuum, a detail will have your car looking just about as clean as when it rolled off the assembly line.

But whether to do it yourself is a decision that you will have to make. Both certainly have their pros and cons. Depending on how much time you have and what specifically you are looking for the detail may sway your decision one way or the other.

Here are some areas to consider when deciding whether to do a DIY detail or have it done by a professional service.

Cost

This is likely one of the major areas most people think of when deciding whether or not to get a professional detail. There might be a bit of a sticker shock when you are quoted for a detail by a professional company. This is especially true with either a larger vehicle or a deeper overall cleaning.

However, when you consider the specialized cleaning solutions and tools you would need to buy to achieve similar results, may make the professional detailing more appealing. That said, if you plan on detailing your car often, the initial cost of the supplies and cleaning solutions can be considered an investment.

There is a chance the initial costs could be made up for, but it would take several cleanings.

Winner: Professional (initially)

Time

Along with the high cost of a quality detail, a good one will also take more time. Professional companies often charge a premium for their services as their experienced employees know how to efficiently flow through the interior and exterior of a car, as well as what order things they should clean in.

Even if you are a “seasoned vet” with cleaning your car and know it like the back of your hand, nothing can match the teamwork and experience of a professional detailing crew.

If you enjoy the work and you get a sense of pride looking at the results of your own hard work, you might consider a DIY detail.

Winner: Professional

Convenience

This is very similar to time but belongs almost on its own. The time actually spent on detailing your car might be significantly less than if you did it yourself. However, if you factor in getting to and from the detailing location, as well as any other transportation while the car is being cleaned, the total time might be closer. It is the ability to find an opening in the schedule, as well as coordinate supporting rides that make the convenience of the DIY detail edge out.

Winner: DIY

How Dirty the Car is

There is only so much, even a professional detailing crew can accomplish and clean in a certain amount of time. If your car is incredibly dirty or filled with odds and ends from a recent car trip, it might be worth taking some time to remove all of the straw wrappers, empty water bottles or anything else that might make whoever will do the detailing easier.

Not unlike giving food-covered dishes a quick rinse before adding them to the dishwasher, this initial cleaning will only help in the end.

It is the specific type of dirt and grime you are trying to get up that may move your decision to a professional service, vs. DIY. If it will take just throwing away any refuse that has built up with little grime left over, it might not make sense to pay for someone else to do that.

However, if you are looking to clean up spills or remove built-up pet hair, a professional service can save a lot of money, time, and frustration.

Winner: DIY (for the most part)

Warning Lights You Shouldn’t Ignore

Seeing a warning light come on in your vehicle’s instrument cluster can cause an uneasy feeling. Whether you are just about home from a daily commute or halfway through a cross-country road trip, these indicator lights get your heart racing, and you wonder just how much it will cost to repair whatever caused the light to come on.

However, not all indicator lights are the same. Some are alerting you to temporary conditions of the vehicle that will go away after a few more miles. Others are giving you a head’s up that a service is needed to maintain the best functioning of your car’s engine.

Some fit neither of these categories. These indications must be taken care of immediately to prevent potentially irreparable damage to your vehicle and its power train.

Cautionary Indicator Lights (think “yellow”)

Depending on your particular vehicle, several indicator lights are common across brands and others are not. Regardless, there are some of these lights that, while they show something is wrong or abnormal, are more friendly reminders, suggestions, or things to add to your list of things to do. These include tire pressure, service interval, and traction control system lights. These usually show temporary conditions where driving can continue until a convenient time for a more thorough inspection. Along with walking around the vehicle each time before driving, and doing a short pre-drive check, paying attention to these and taking care of them when you can, may save you money.

Warning Lights (almost always red)

As the color would show, if you see one of these lights, it is almost assuredly a good idea to stop as soon as safely practical. There still is a chance it is just a temporary condition that might resolve itself. The alternatives and what might happen if these are ignored are far worse and much more costly than the inconvenience of stopping and a tow to the nearest mechanic.

In each of these, the best course of action is to stop when you are able and have it checked out. As with every electronic indicator, there is a chance of a malfunction in the indicator itself. Only a check by a mechanic will you know for sure.

Oil-Pressure Warning

Your engine oil not only provides the proper lubrication between parts, some moving at thousands of rotations each minute, but it also provides an essential layer of thermal cooling to the piston and cylinders. Without the proper flow around these critical parts, the metal would heat to the point of possibly fusing once stopped, if not develop catastrophic cracking beforehand.

Whether a red image of an old-fashioned oil can, or red letters reading “OIL”, this light shows the oil is not flowing as it should. This light could mean you’re overdue for an oil change but it could indicate you’re leaking oil which will very soon ruin your engine.

Transmission Temperature

Not unlike your car’s engine, the transmission has many small parts moving rapidly with extremely small tolerances. All the same potential issues apply within the contained until of your transmission. Although the movement of the transmission components themselves is enough to circulate the transmission fluid without added pressure, issues with the supply, or leaks in the system itself, can create high temperature and pose similar risks of part fusion or thermal fatigue.

An engine that gets too hot has the potential to crack and, if extreme, requires complete replacement.

Engine Temperature

Issues with your engine temperature are usually indicated by a red light of a thermometer in a wavy liquid. This means your engine is overheating and attempts should be made to cool it as soon as possible. There are several reasons this might occur, but the main goal to prevent catastrophic damage to your car’s engine is to remove the heat from the engine area and get the motor turned off as soon as possible. As you look for a safe place to pull off, turn off your air-conditioner (if on) and crank the heat to the passenger compartment. This will help to draw the heat from the engine bay.

Once you pull over and turn off the motor, wait at least 15 minutes, if not more, to open the hood. This will help prevent scalding hot coolant or other fluids from splashing on your hands or face.

A punctured radiator is a likely culprit and not a terrible expensive fix compared to replacing the engine, which is required if it overheats too much or too long. However, there are many other reasons a car might overheat so have a professional check it.

What Do Car Smells Mean?

Although something chemical smelt when taking a trip doesn’t always mean you are in imminent danger, it’s always best to know what the most common odors mean and what you should do next…

Serious Smells…

If you detect a rotten egg smell it’s sulfur gas or hydrogen sulfide leaking from the catalytic converters or maybe the fuel filters. If the fluid in the filter isn’t changed it can create a rotten egg smell throughout the system.

A mold or mildew smell could be a problem with the air conditioner, possibly items like leaves or sweet wrappers blocking it. This may in turn lead to water flowing onto your carpets or mats. The air conditioner should be run every month or so for about two minutes, but most people forget—especially in the winter.

A strange syrupy or candy smell is the odor of the coolant, also known as ethylene gycol, the same substance used in antifreeze. It may mean that your car is in danger of overheating. It shouldn’t be driven but taken immediately to a repair shop.

The smell of smoke or burning oil is probably an oil leak. If the oil leak hits the exhaust a fire will result, so it’s vital that this is dealt with immediately.

Should you encounter something similar to burnt paper especially when moving the gears could be the result of pressing down the clutch pedal too much. Not many people know that the clutch is sensitive to overuse and as a result could fail.

Burning plastic may be a short circuit, for example a wire being worn down, or alternately, chewed by a small animal. Another explanation would be an item such as a plastic bag entering the exhaust. It’s best to take it to be repaired as both of these are too dangerous to be dealt with by most regular car owners.

A smell of gas a long time after you fill the tank should be cause for concern. Sometimes gasoline does spill onto shoes, coats etc. so it’s always best to check. It could be something like a faulty gas cap or fuel injector. As always, it’s best to take it to the garage.

If you can smell what seems like the exhaust when you are sitting in the car the best thing to do is to roll down your window and take it to the garage immediately.

Lifestyle Smells…

Here are some handy hints to remove smells which you may encounter in everyday use, apart from the item most commonly used–air freshener hanging from the rear-view mirror!

A smell from the car’s carpet may be removed by a car vacuum, especially if it has steam clean or a wash function.

Baking powder shouldn’t be placed on the upholstery for instance but placed in a bowl and left in the car overnight to attack any smells in the vicinity.

Those tumble dryer sheets can do miracles if it’s a hot day. Just leave a couple in the back window to replace smells and leave a fresh scent. Or you could use a freshly washed cushion or towel, as long as you remember to remove it after about a day.

A water and vinegar mixture can remove the smell of vomit – and remove it with a vinegar smell but pick your battles, eh!

So now that you’ve cleared your car of bad “lifestyle” smells, you have no excuse to miss an odor that indicates a mechanical issue.

Tesla and Mercedes Reliability

You can always rely on Tesla and Mercedes Benz right? Wrong. Despite an increase in their technical ability these are two cars which sit at the bottom of the Auto Reliability Report.

It gets worse though. The report investigates in excess of 300,000 cars and compares how they perform.

To be fair, the list is not comprehensive to all cars. They’re attempting to compare Apples to Apples, so they only include car models that were introduced within the past three years. (Any car brand which has had a major redesign can only have the redesigned car or cars investigated.) So basically this isn’t attempting to compare the reliability of new Tesla to a 1969 Ford Pinto or something. We’re talking about reliability issues when compared to other new model cars.

There appears to be problems with high technology – the digital controls are a headache for some people to understand. Exactly why some fairly inconspicuous things such as door handles keep being redesigned seems to be another mystery. In other words, designers and engineers still struggle with what the public will consider user friendly.

The study of making something intuitive is called UXUI and it’s been a chronic struggle in all technology reliant fields for many years.

So with all excuses, er, valid reasons, and caveats now listed, here are the findings.

The Tesla Model Y has the unfortunate honor of being one of the 10 least reliable cars, which includes how the paint reacts to stimulus, the climate system and so on. Yet many people still want to buy a Tesla.

There have been complaints of various scratches on the paintwork, creaking doors and even rattling heard while driving. These aren’t major issues, but they will be annoying for any owner. Certainly, it’s not what you may expect from a luxury car.

The noise problem specifically, may be a symptom of another common complaint– “panel gaps.” A panel gap happens during the car’s construction. The car’s various panels, such as the roof, each of the doors, the hood and so on can only have so much room between it and the next panel or it will result in weird noises when driving. There is a special instrument which measures how much panel gap there is.

RepairPal marks the Mercedes Benz as average, which although makes it a typical car isn’t what you expect from a Merc. They cost an average repair cost of $908 per year which is, it turns out, the average cost of repairing a car. One might expect to pay more to fix a luxury car, but to have less frequent cause to repair them. Only 13% of all repairs are severe but that’s generally the case with all repairs from all makers studied.

Again, this is a new car, not one you bought off a teenager who modified it for street racing or something.

The cost of ownership is related to reliability – how likely it is to break down – and how much it costs when it does. To put a spin on the problems with Mercedes, at least people aren’t experiencing out of the ordinary repair bills. It’s the normal repair bills which are the problem.

In tests the BMW performs better than the Merc. According to the Reliability Index, the Mercedes Benz is rated about the same as a Jeep, which sounds all right, until you realize that a Jeep isn’t a luxury brand, so it could be argued that paying more for prestige didn’t also buy you a better vehicle. Based on these numbers you’re better off buying a Jeep and saving up the rest for repairs.

So, if the prestige is what you care about, you are still okay. So that means Mercedes Benz neither overdelivers nor underdelivers.

Not everyone agrees with this assessment – after all the Mercedes E-class was the 2021 Car of the Year including quality of the ride. The ride quality is to do with how well the car deals with road surface looks, rather than the aesthetic nature of the dashboard or how comfortable the car seat looks. So, we aren’t being very fair if we indicate that Merc buyers are only going for prestige. Quality is in the eye of the car buyer and your decision could be based on your own list of criteria.

Our only challenge is the perception many buyers have, that luxury cars are “better quality,” which may or may not be true if you’re viewing it through the lens of the repair bill.

Heavy Duty Car Equipment

Not all car equipment you find in garages and workshops are easily managed, some of them by design need to be massive both in size and in weight. But why are they so large? Let’s see…

An engine hoist is a device or machine to use lift the engine out of the car—some places can only be access with the engine out. And it gives you a look at the engine close up. These machines are not always mechanical in nature, but they always take up room. Although simple ones can raise 2 tons the more complicated chain block hoists can raise as much as 5 tons and go up as far as 78.7 inches, the equivalent of 6 feet 7 inches.

A load leveler is there to hook to something like a crane, or in this case a hoist and helps compensate when the load is off level.

You can remove a car engine without a hoist by parking on a level surface and applying the brake. Next you place a jack under the chassis at the front so the vehicle is high enough to work under it comfortably.

As you may have guessed by the name, a car ramp lifts the car up a sloped surface which makes repair easier – alternately it can just lift the front wheels. If your car has low ground clearance – for example sports cars – they need a special kind of ramp.

A scissor lift creates a platform which can rise almost effortlessly for objects as heavy as 20 tons. You need to make sure it fits all the required standards and may include items such as guardrails. There are also double, triple and even quadruple scissor lifts out there. For longer vehicles you may need to acquire a tandem scissor platform lift.

A more flexible device but still quite heavy is a trolley jack. This can also fit in low level cars such as sports cars. For safety’s sake it’s best to use it in combination with axle stands in case something goes wrong.

Other fairly large items you need include tool chests and cabinets as well as battery chargers or starters – also known as jump starters and electric tire inflators. It could be a problem storing electrical items in the winter as many have problems if there is frosty weather outside and least when you plug them in but if your garage is fully insulated there should be no problem.

Bulky Replacement Parts:

It might seem like keeping enough parts around to account for any part that’s likely to fail or wear out is going to require a lot of storage space, but in reality you can stock a lot of parts in a smallish space.

However, some parts are going to take up room. Radiators can be large and take up space unless you only work on one type of car. Exhaust systems are long and difficult to store in a shop. Best to acquire these as needed.

You can get replacement car batteries for your vehicle if necessary. Most people don’t realize that they tend to last a mere five years or so, hence the need for battery checks.

If a car battery has to cope with extremes of temperature, inactivity or the number of rough journeys. The chemical reactions in the car battery tend not to work. A parasitic drain causes it to wear out before its time.

Batteries don’t seem that bulky if you have an I.C.E. car because you only need the one to start the car up. However, modern electric cars take many which makes for a very expensive service every five years—or less. The disposal casts alone (core charge) is pretty costly.

You may not be aware of what fume extraction is, it’s to do with removing the smoke that comes from constantly starting cars up. Some are fixed in one place while others allow for greater flexibility. Parts such as nozzles and hoses can be replaced if need be.

If you’re running your own shop, say out of your home, space can be an issue. You’ll need a safe place to keep entire cars while you wait for parts you order. While on your property these cars are your responsibility so a good fence is a must. Also, upgraded insurance.

Sunroof Problems

Sunroofs are seen in the most higher end cars and their ability to allow more fresh air to circulate is a desirable quality, but what are the downsides of having a sunroof?

Most people don’t realize that having a sunroof increases the cost of insurance.

Some Types of Sunroofs

Cars like the Honda Civic have a pop-up roof where the window tilts up. Which only seems to be another access point for criminals or water, but the bigger challenges come with panoramic roofs.

A panoramic roof is a much larger roof going all the way from the front to the back where part of it can slide open. There will also be an additional amount of heat on the seats on hot days, so that’s another problem with this type of roof.

Unsurprisingly panoramic roofs aren’t very good in a rollover crash. No one wants to learn this, but your sunroof is another way you might exit your car in a crash if you aren’t wearing a seatbelt, but the moral of that is to wear that seatbelt. Fortunately, only 1% of all crashes are rollovers.

Exploding Sunroofs

An exploding sunroof sounds unbelievable, but it does happen, it’s just the sunroof shattering but it’s traumatic to people who experience it. There’s usually no reason and unfortunately it’s more likely to occur if you own a panoramic sunroof. Several lawsuits have been made against car companies over exploding sunroofs.

This kind of accident fortunately doesn’t happen that often. It’s more common to encounter things like cracks or chips which cause it to be replaced. Just one more window to get hit with rocks and road debris.

Gas Mileage

Driving at speed with the sunroof down creates additional drag and means that the fuel consumption is higher, as bizarre as it may seem.

You may even not use your sunroofs for months on end, especially if they are driven in a cold environment. A panoramic sunroof can even weigh as much as 90Kg.

They can also remove the headroom as cars without sunroofs just have more room for the tops of the seats. 

Regular maintenance of the workings – the electrical components, the glass and so on – is required. The electric problems could be something like a broken motor or a fuse going. The annoying part is that they may be stuck in the open position. Even something like dirt getting into the works can affect it, so it’s best to keep a car with a sunroof in a garage or similar.

Older and Cheaper are more Prone to Problems

They is especially a problem in older cars as they are more inclined to leak. Seals get old over time and the sun ages them. Sunroof seals are in the sun whenever there is sun to be had. Though this is less of a problem with the more expensive cars.

Problems with the rubber rim aren’t too expensive to repair, it’s just time consuming. It’s advisable not to take a car with a sunroof into a car wash. Rust can also form around the sunroof’s rim as it gets older.

To add to the problems, they are also much harder to sell. It’s desirable for buyers to have but it’s not always that desirable.

Lastly, the scientists have wondered if there should be an airbag in the sunroof? The research is mixed on how much it would help.